MTA expands program for open strollers on buses

Almost a year ago Danielle Avissar and other parents rallied together for the moment parents could bring open strollers on city buses. Up until last October, riders were only allowed to bring on strollers that were folded.

“I was completely outraged because how do you fold the stroller? How do you hold your child? And also I’ve been in a bus accident before. If you’re holding your child, you don’t go flying through, so it’s completely unsafe,” said Avissar.

Parents and disability advocates called on the MTA to move forward with a plan to make buses more accessible for parents, caregivers and those with disabilities. Last September the MTA announced a pilot program to allow open strollers into a designated area on 140 buses over seven routes.

On Tuesday the MTA announced it’s expanding the program.


What You Need To Know

  • Last September the MTA announced a pilot program to allow open strollers into a designated area on 140 buses over seven routes

  • The next phase of the pilot will include stroller areas on 1,000 buses across the five boroughs

  • The Transit Workers Union voiced concerns for the program in fear that if expanded the stroller areas may cause disputes over space

  • The MTA says they will announce the new routes in the coming weeks


“The feedback from our customers and our operators have been overwhelmingly positive and we’ve had no reported incidents related to open strollers on our pilot buses,” said Frank Annicaro, an MTA senior vice president who oversees New York City busses.

The next phase of the pilot will include stroller areas on 1,000 buses across the five boroughs.

Christine Serdjenian Yearwood, a mom, says the expansion is a game changer.

“I never would have taken the bus before this. I have two other kids and it’s really was unsafe to be folding up the stroller on the side of the street and have two other kids,” said Yearwood.

But now both she and Avissar say this opens doors for their family.

“It makes you feel like an included member in public transit society. I love the fact that even though it’s crowded as a designated spot, there’s that mutual respect and understanding between caretakers and just the general public that’s riding the bus,” said Avissar.

The Transit Workers Union voiced concerns for the program in fear that if expanded the stroller areas may cause disputes over space, but MTA says so far the programs appears to be successful and has actually sped up the boarding process.

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